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I was at a LFS yesterday and was thinking about buying some fish, but there were heaps of people in the shop and im aprehensive about scooping the fish out myself. :blush:

Long story short, i came across these weirdly coloured cories, i thought they must have been medicated of something two of them were fluro pink and another three were blueish. I was just looking through google to see if they were a hybrid species or something similar, apparently they are injected with colouring and are actually corydoras aeneus. :blush:

I was wondering if anybody has ever had one? if so did they live long?

I've found a link with pictures of them coloured i think the top two were the ones that were in the shop: http://www.ppaquarium.com/view.asp?page=TV619

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They are dyed cories :) Those Son of &^$#%$ are dying them, by injecting colours into them :blush: Don't buy them, ever, never ever! and I would not buy from the LFS either, just for the principle. Boycott them :blush: fish like that are prone to diseases and all sort of problems because of dying etc.. so it's not wise takign them on, especially since you are buying stock from the shop -which make them believe they are good sellers :betta:

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thanks for the reply faewyn, I doubt it will please you to know that on the website given i also found coloured black skirt tetras :blush: ,which weren't in the shop, the shop is actually a chain and the first ive seen with coloured corys. Wouldn't corys been even more prone to disease as well, because they dont have scales? :blush: which is why at first i thought that it may had been from medication. :betta:

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I think the reason, or one of the reasons that it leaves the fish more prone to disease, is because in order for the dying process to be effective, the mucus coating of the fish is stripped away... the coating being one of the first lines of defence the fish has against disease. It is a horrible thing to do to a fish. Dont ever ever buy any dyed fish, when they are bought, it only encourages more fish-dying because they think there is a market for it.

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Fish Dying has been around for awhile now, and they're always bringing out new dyed fish. Like Jess said, boycott that oarticular LFS so that they know that if they sell artirficially coloured fish they aint gonna get no business

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This is digusting... Tell you what. I rather buy paint injected humans (the ones who inject paint into the fish) than paint injected fish. People are cruel enough to do that should get a taste of their own medicine. I once saw painted tetras and ALL had whitespots, fungus and a range of other diseases. Boycott!!!

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I've seen pictures of fish that have had tattoos... as in, lots and lots of tiny individual dye injections on each side... much worse than the (I assume) single injection to add the dye as we are all familiar with. One of the pictures I saw was of a fish that had been tattooed to give it a repeating diamond pattern... People who do or support this sort of thing need to go to that special place in hell reserved for wife beaters . . .

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They use tattooing on wild caughts to help identify individuals within a colony, but its only one scale, and its like "C'mon man, do if for your species!" the cories are really silly looking on top of everything else. They primarily do black skirts, indian glassfish, blind cave tetras, and cories. I've even seen coloured glass cats, which is stupid as they are wimpy with illness and stress. Other than the standard DON'T BUY THEM line, there are a few things that should be noted. Many people buy the fish without knowing that they are altered, or they don't realise how the alterations take place. I mean, they look like perfectly healthy fish to a newbie. I have a friend who is a very experienced fishkeeper who has 2 painted glassfish in his tank. They are 7 years old and very healthy. He started with many more who dropped off over the years. Originally, he had no idea they were dyed either, but I am proud that when he found out he still treated them as worthwhile to look after. Mortality rate is higher than standard fish, but not enough to make it not worth their while. From dying to the pet shop there must be a fairly reasonable loss rate. It'd be higher than your average fish, but i shouldn't imagine that it'd be horrendous. It is market-driven, and dyed fish don't const markedly more, so it'd have to be ok. When they start getting shipped however, thats when the problems start. Making holes in skin and scales and injecting foreign substances, or stripping off the protective slime coat in acid leaves them wide open to infection. The stress of pet shop tanks, uncycled tanks and netting and handling will all lower resistance, so even if they look OK in the shop tank, they are very hit and miss. I'd avoid them unless you are adopting them from an established tank. They aren't lepers, but they are more fragile, and the practice should not be supported.

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It's a cruel practice in that it deliberately increases the overall mortality of a population merely to "improve on nature" in the survivors. However, there isn't even the rationale that the "improved" individuals will pass on the characteristic to offspring, as there would be with, say, selective breeding for a recessive trait that carried a higher incidence of mortality. For example, in some dog breeds it is possible to obtain a particular coat colour by breeding two carriers of the gene. Statistically, 25% of offspring will have the desired coat colour, which they will pass on to the next generation, but 25% will also have a lethal recessive defect, necessitating their destruction. Personally I would not pursue such a breeding practice, but many breeders find it an acceptable practice in order to achieve a new strain. However, when the characteristic is an artificial alteration, not a genetic trait (as with dyed fish), it's much more difficult to justify. Anyway, it's just plain tacky and in very poor taste -- like dyed blue carnations! PS. Hey, I'm a Sooty Grunter!! :(

Edited by VickiPS
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Oh hey! speaking about painted fish... Not sure if they were painted or bleached but when we were up in QLD aquarium trawling on monday, we saw black and white tiger oscars!! Now, never having seen them before I thought they were rather cute... until I spotted the white spots on ALL of them... That's when my mind spun.. and i told Nam to back away... - Mishy posing as N*A*M ;)

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dying fish is very wrong it gives them caner and all sorts of problems i had some i brought just to get them out of my lfs after about 2 months they all started to go crazy fighting skin peeling spots goodness know what else. They dont keep them any more good shirley

Edited by daisyduck
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No no.. Mousie, i'm not talking white albino tigers... we get those over here... (the ones that are white and red... yes?) These were TIGER TIGER oscars, but the markings were WHITE instead of RED... bodies were still the standard black. Plus, because we've never seen anything like it before we tried to film it to show everyone, but the store got narky... makes me wonder what they have to hide... esp since every other aquarium/pet store has never had a problem with us filming.... Hmm... indeed

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More recently I've seen tiger barbs being dyed too. Normally you can tell when they're dyed because it simply doesn't look natural.

I've never seen a heathy dyed glass fish, almost every time they are covered in whitespot and the dyed cories are very thin.

I've also seen pictures of dyed parrot cichlid and one of a dyed blue albino oscar, I found this article whilst browsing:

http://www.practicalfishkeeping.co.uk/pfk/...em.php?news=790

I've seen a rainbow shark with clear fins, but I think it was an oddball.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Yep... that's why i was curious :)

They looked like a white tiger... all white and black

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did they look something like the second fellow down on this page mishy? http://fins.actwin.com/species/index.php?t=9&i=239

if so, thats a normal variation of oscars called a tiger oscar. As a baby that fellow would look whitish on the olive green parts. Sometimes they develop a bit of red as they get older. The ones that are totally red through that part are Red Tiger Oscars

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  • 3 weeks later...

Hmm.. thanks Daniel. Mouse, it's that colour but with tiger stripes. But the black was more black... like a real tiger... *shrug* I guess it's something you gotta see to believe.

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