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Recomended Reading For Betta's And Tanks


Bender
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I would like to obtain some good books on betta's, and also on growing and maintaining planted tanks. As I will be restricted in the number of volumes I can afford, it would be a great help to me if you could recommend any books that you have yourself have found both informative, and practical.

Thanks in advance!

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  • 4 weeks later...

Hmm.... I'm not sure that I could recommend any that are a 'must have' in preference to other ones. I find that all books need to be read with a questioning mind. Published authors still get stuff wrong. But I like books and I often buy them simply to add to my collection rather than the book having particular merit. Anyway here's a list of the ones I have. Some of them may be out of print now but you might be able to find second hand copies on eBay.

Betta Books

Lucas, Gene. Siamese Fighting Fish. Good all-round book by the grand-daddy of betta genetics.

Parnell, Victoria. The New Betta. Another good all-rounder by the author of bettysplendens.com

Maurus, Walt. A Complete Introduction to Bettas. My first betta book and the one that got me started with breeding.

Ostrow, Marshall E. Bettas. Very similar to the Walt Maurus book.

Nantaterm, Sittisak. Amazing Thai Betta. Mostly a picture book and the pictures are rather fabulous. Some of the colour descriptions are not standard so you have to take it with a huge grain of salt.

Vierke, Jörg. Bettas, Gouramis and Other Anabantoids. Interesting for its descriptions of the other labyrinth fishes.

Plant Books

Hiscock, Peter. Encyclopedia of Aquarium Plants. A good all-rounder but as an encyclopeida, the plant profiles are still missing a few species. It has good information on lighting, fertilisation and substrate.

Amano, Takashi. Nature Aquarium World, Books 1, 2 and 3. Stunning photographs. These were the books that first got me interested in planted tanks. But they're a bit low on explanation.

Scheurmann, Ines. Aquarium Plants Manual. A very basic book which covers the care of most of the readily available plants. But there are plenty of plants missing.

Walstad, Diana. Ecology of the Planted Aquarium. From the advocate of the natural planted tank, ie natural light, natural substrate, no filter etc. It's interesting but at the same time quite a tiresome read, mostly because of the university essay style layout and no colour pictures (apart from the one on the cover). I'm ashamed to admit I skipped to the end. I had to. My long suppressed, inner homicidal maniac (affectionately known as 'Stabber') was starting to surface. If I'm going to be reading about the role of phenolics and a plant's phenylpropanoid metabolism for synthesizing lignins, I'm gonna need a pretty picture to break it up a bit. What can I say? I'm shallow like that.

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ditto. I was reading a page of lighting before and OMG! After about the first paragraph I got lost and went about doing other things....

Not really a good way to hold peoples attention.

Speaking of which, they should produce books with lamens terms.....maybe even a series for aquatic enthusiasts, :D

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;) *lol* Actually have tears of laughter! Thank you Bettarazzi, that is the best review of a book I have ever read!

Personally it is bad movies that threaten to bring out my maniac, but mines called Pyro. I tame her by removing myself to the kitchen and experimenting. Books like that however release my inner Nerd, not such a problem for me, but he (yep, it's a he) has aspergers, and can be rather hard to live with.

Usually the internet is my reference, but I find it hard to remember where I found some piece of information in the sea of options. So I like to keep a few books on my interests that I can physically flick through and find the page I want.

I agree with what your saying about having a questioning mind. There are so many arrogant so and so's that are ready to publish what they think is right, without ever researching what they are saying and a complete refusal to adjust their views despite other evidence, that I find the majority of what I read is, if not complete rubbish, riddled with flaws. The information available online for betta's has got to be one of the best examples of this I have ever seen! I think I could rant about this for pages :D , it's one of my pet hates.

Thanks for giving me a run down on your books! I find it extremely helpful to have a reference like that to start working with.

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  • 4 years later...

Okay - Xmas is approaching (way too rapidly) and my kids are beginning to ask what does dad want from Santa...

I have an order in for a new barracks system for my girls, but for stocking fillers, books are always a great choice.

So, in addition to those mentioned above by Raz (and excellent list), anybody else have any suggestions?

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Everything 'Razzi has listed above are pretty much the benchmark of all betta/plant books. I am yet to find a betta book that goes into as much depth as some of the guppy books... For a good coffee table book, if you can find a copy, I'd recommend Amazing Thai Betta. It is a great photo book and good for a bit of inspiration when things go wrong in the fishroom ;)

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