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Aphids on my lillies


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I can't seem to get rid of these things and they are sucking my little banana lillies dry. I think they came in on some azolla that I had growing outside in tubs, and they've just multiplied like mad with all the surface area and succulent plants.

I've been dunking the leaves, but they stay attached. I've been dunking and scraping them off, but they just float to some other part of a plant that is sticking out. I'm about ready to drag all of the lillies out of the tank, stuff them in a bucket and douse them in white oil or something. I've had enough of these little devils!

Phil suggested I pin the leaves underwater for a while, and I tried that but the tank houses 4 brown backed crabs who took much delight in snipping the submerged leaves from their moorings in their effort to use them as a climbing apparatus. *sigh*

Has anyone had this problem before and does anyone have any other ideas?

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I really can't think of anything that would work without being a problem in the tank. I've used soapy water on house plants before, if you were going to remove them from the tank for treatment in a bucket maybe that would be better than white oil as it's easier to rinse off. A little vinegar in the rinse water helps remove any soap.

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Guest TerryR

Mix 1 teaspoon of vegetable oil with 1 ltr of hot water, spray a VERY fine mist over the surface of the water, this will kill off the aphids. Your biological filter will break down the oil in a few days.

Cheers Terry

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  • 1 month later...
Guest gwandana

That would be the perfect answer. find some fish that eats them. Killies yep, anyone else know what fish would love these guys fir lunch?

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  • 2 weeks later...
Guest myon.tourage

Ive had just the same problem... gave me a bit of a surprise. I think the most difficult part is the eggs, and i also found that the reproduced VERY quickly in these warm conditions. (dunno what the dif would be like up north, but down here were talking a good 15 -20 degrees above outside at the time)

My solution was to cull all leaves of banana lillies ( took me i beleive about 2 days to notice what was going on - long story (i wasnt around)) by which time they were already severely damaged and many eggs had been laid. I also removed all duckweed (not fun - used nets) and then took off the lipid film with paper towel (still think about the dioxide bleaches, but didnt have any losses or problems with filter. lipid film important because by this time they were moving over it, perhaps eating biofilm... certainly higher in protein than sap... would consider this if using oil treatment, although would certainly be digested by microorganisms to some end product... perhaps oily bug crap??

after doing this a couple days in a row had no more troubles. worth checking your housepants/garden, because although very easily transported, they obviously come from somewhere.

know this is after the fact, but hope it helps someone.

Theo.

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  • 2 months later...

Wow..... :D ......My turn for the aphid invasion has arrived, hundreds of them! Every water sprite was almost covered in them. I chucked them all out. Tanks that had all manner of surface plants OTHER than watersprite were unaffected by aphids. All of my tanks have killies and I noticed they will not eat them, they spit them back out. I spent all night looking through a magnifier and crushing the little <_< ers. I'll attack them again until they are gone. Totally YUK. - Brad.

Edited by Brad
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Arrrgghhh *^&%$@(+ *lol* !!. Another tank absolutely invaded by aphids!, and there's no water sprite in this tank either. There goes another one of my wild theories.

But, here is the good news, I have discovered a very easy non-toxic way to destroy them.

Step 1- Cut a piece of thin cotton bedsheet to a size about 20mm larger all round than the surface of your tank.

2- Cut a hole a couple of inches round in the middle so your labrynths can do the "whales in the pack ice" breathing thing. Leave the light on to make the hole obvious.

3- Boil it just to be sure there is no washing soap present in the cloth.

4- Lay it onthe water surface and run the edges up the inner sides sides of the tank.

5- Leave the clothh there till the aphids (or any other surface bug for that matter) have drowned.

Cheers!, - Brad.

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Thanks Lisa, it does work, however the second wave are now appearing. There are nowhere near as many - (so far......). When there is a substantial population I will again send them to "Davey Jones's Locker" :((:) The up-side of this method is that you don't have to chuck out your surface plants.

- Brad.

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