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Importing Killifish


JUNGLE
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Short answer is no. It kills me!

Only adults can be imported, and only the genuses aphyosemion, epiplatys and aplocheilus are allowable imports. These are the ones that do not appear on AB in Thailand :-) I have yet to canvas the notho sellers to see if they have aphyos, but are just not advertising.

Usually only a few mass produced aquarium strains are imported. Occasionally something cool pops up still tho!

The eggs available on AB are enough to make you cry!

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Yeah, probably a matter of someone going to the trouble of writing a submission, species are added occasionally. Peacock gudgeons and frontosa in the last few years, I hear it's expensive and there's no guaranteed outcome, but worth looking into.

That would mean no eggs, but potentially adults, of a different genus. Would only change things if they are ones available in countries we can import from, so probably aim for nothobranchius or simpsonichthys. Some day, who knows?

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We only have a dozen or so species of Aphyo/Fp. here at the moment, and alot of those are 'aquarium strain'. As you know, killi people like to maintain if possible location and collection data on different populations of a species in captivity. So there are many many species and just as many 'populations' of each species available out there that -are- allowable imports.

Two problems, at least as I see it. One, most trade overseas is done in eggs, because they ship more easily , and are easier to produce to sell compared to live fish. No eggs allowed in, so not happening here. Second, where adult fish are traded, it's usually on the hobbyist level, namely, small numbers between private individuals. That is not really feasible when making an international shipment. When there are large enough quantities, we're usually talking about mass produced aquarium strain fish that are not as highly desirable, but more more doable commercially. There also has to be someone willing to sell where you can import from, and most of the Thai killi places do nothos and simps. spp. because they sell eggs not live fish. There are some options in the USA, but unfortunately someone tells me that nothing comes from America normally, so we'd have to book a special shipment for our boxes alone. Thousands of dollars, scarily expensive.

So the only option is to keep looking and very occasionally something new pops up, or canvas, as I am starting to do, killi and betta sellers on Aquabid, and see if we can't find someone somewhere we can tranship from who has allowable imports.

That went on for a bit, I hope I made sense. If anyone has any updates, please let me know!

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I believe that can be keep reasonable.....provided you have large quantities of the first 4..... :bighug:

Just need to find a hobbyist or commercial breeder in Thailand willing to raise eggs to adults on consignment....the rest is straight forward???

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  • 3 weeks later...

Hi All

The reason why killi eggs are not allowed to be imported in from AB is due to the soil.

If the eggs itself can be transported safely then in a way it should be ok. However, because of the peat/soil that comes in will definitely get destroyed by Quarantine.

This is a good thing in a way as it prevents anything foreign out there trying to get in our country.

We do have quite unique fish as well and their are a few strains of viruses/bacteria out in other countries that has there incubation stages in soil.

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Are you sure it's due to the soil/peat? Do you have a link or any official notification for that information? Killie eggs can easily be sent wrapped in damp paper. However I'm not sure how quarantine officers would be able to tell the difference between killifish eggs of species that are allowed eg. aphyosemions, and those that are prohibited eg. nothos. If they can't tell for sure that something isn't going to turn out to be a biological hazard or that it's on the permitted species list, I don't see how they can allow it into the country.

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That's right Bettarazzi.

This is almost funny because for the last 25yrs we have just accepted the import restrictions.

Maybe I just have a different take on things,being a Horticulturist.

I recently joined the new Australian Cryptocoryne Society.They have the same issues.

Since I knew that orchids can be brought in without problems,I was able to find a way to bring Crypts into the country again.

I have also set in place the right condition to bring Killies in.This will start within a couple of months.

Amazing that a couple of experts can decide things are impossible and we all consider their opinion to be the law.

Haha

Not trying to be a smartass here guys.

Just proves that the hobby is full of cases where an expert says something and no-one questions it.

I love watching people experiment for themselves.

This is how we all learn.

I may be set in my ways.....but will try any logical new method if it seems to have merit.

Edited by JUNGLE
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You're right anthony, at the end of the day they have inertia on their side, but they're just a bunch of people who have laudable goals, who do not value achieving ours and theirs at the same time.

The long and hair tearing other option is the try and add a genus to the allowable imports list, which was done a few years ago for frontosa and peacock gudgeons. But your way will be quicker and more effective I'm sure! I'm not getting any younger... :-D

Yeah, razzi's got it, eggs are verboten because it could be an egg of anything under the sun, noone knows until it hits a certain size after hatching. And sending them in dirt doesn't exactly make things look clean and antisceptic :-)

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It's a different world these days... The SKGers tell me the same sort of thing. Really, it slowly became more troublesome, but the iron curtain only came down after 2001.

I'm still floating about mate, can't get rid of me that easily! :-D

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Oh it's embarrassing, even just personally, to think of the species that I have had only in the last 10 years that I didn't do much with, that then were lost.

I'm all for quarantine, but saying that the fish themselves are an unacceptable risk is unsupported, as I said, because it's more work to say otherwise.

Also noteworthy, one of the largest, altho now slightly reorganised, genus of killies, Aphyosemion, is a legal import. The problem is finding people who can ship us the ones we want :-)

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