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eggy
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  • 1 month later...

this post is a bit old, but some arthropods etc can reproduce asexually or sexually, unfertilized eggs are clones of the mother. Don't know if it applies to fairy shrimp though. They'd be female though, not male.

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Honeybees produce drones (males) from unfertilised eggs. They therefore are haploid (only have 1 copy of each gene, instead of 2, diploid).

Diploid parthenogenesis is also possible.

Brine shrimp can be parthenogenic: http://wildlife.utah.gov/gsl/brineshrimp/parthenogenesis.php

Fairy shrimp info: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fairy_shrimp

Brine and fairy shrimp are closely related, so it's possible that they could be parthenogic, but I could not find any information about fairy shrimp specifically.

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With regards to the brine shrimp ...

Callatya says "No, but you seem to get a higher hatch rate if you are moving the eggs around.",

Lyarlla says "I had a better hatch rate with brine shrimp when I didnt airate the water... If you chose to airate, make sure its really slow and only does a few bubbles at a time." and

Lilli says "I have had the best hatch rates when the water is vigorously aerated."

Hmmm... seems like it's a case of whatever works for you.

I've just recently had my first lot of babies so when it came to hatching bs, I just followed the instructions that came with the eggs - well aerated. I've had a greater than 80% hatch rate everytime, so I'll probably just stick to that (just a classic case of "if it ain't broke, don't fix it").

... although :lol: I now feel an experiment coming on.

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