Tell us your BBS hatching methods!

75 posts in this topic

Posted

Mine couldn't be easier.

You need

* 1 L of water

* non-iodised rock salt

* at least 3 x 375ml cups

* permeable paper dust mask

* an airline siphon

* a lamp

* quality BBS eggs

* Tanganyika Lake salts (or bicarb)

1. Get 1L of water. No need to dechlorinate, as chlorine actually softens the bbs egg shell.

2. Add a tablespoon of rock salt

3. Aerate until dissolved

4. Add a pinch of Tanganyika salts/bicarb

5. Get 2 375ml cups

6. Pour half the mixture into each cup

7. Add a tiny amount of quality bbs eggs to ONE of the cups. Do not aerate.

8. Place it under a light source (fluoro, desklamp etc) to heat and light the water.

9. After 12 hours, a) stir cup 1; and b.) repeat steps 7 and 8 with the 2nd cup.

10. After 18 - 24 hours your bbs in 1st cup will have hatched

11. Siphon the brine + bbs from cup 1, being careful not to pick up empty eggshells.

12. Take a 3rd 375ml cup. Place a permeable paper dust mask over the top like a funnel

13. Pour the siphoned brine into cup 3.

14. stir cup 2 and repeat steps 7 - 13 with cup 2

15. Chuck the shell debris out of cup 1, so the cup is ready to use to strain the bbs in cup 2 when they hatch.

Repeat ad infinitum!

You can keep re-using the brine. There is no need to make a fresh mixture as the dust mask means it stays very clean.

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Posted

I am getting enough for one spawn by using a tablespoon of aquarium salt (i think its rocksalt, from petbarn, not marine salt) dissolve that, add eggs and thats it, stir it everytime i walk past :lookaround:

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Posted

Mine has just been putting bout 8L of water in one of those kritter keepers, and chucking a whole lot of salt (bout 4 tablespoons :lookaround: ) in and then dissolving the salt by stirring. then Put in Brine shrimp eggs. next airate it with airstone along the middle of tank. Heated with a light. Find I get enough for my fry this way, as I tend to dump quite a lot of BS eggs into the water, and the BBS slowly hatch rather than all at once ;)

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Posted

Yep good point robbie, i find with my method that the eggs hatch over a few days so the thing is productive for atleast 3 days :lookaround:

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Posted

I've always used the aeration method and it's worked for me (90%+ hatches), so I figure if it's not broke, don't fix it ;)

Equipment

-- 2 x hatcheries made from inverted 1.25l Pepsi bottles, with micro-irrigation control taps fitted into the caps and air line in through the top (cut off bottle base)

-- Wire storage cube and 2 x PVC drainpipe collar for hatchery stand

-- Air pump and airline (split with T-connector , and flow valves in each line)

-- Desk lamp

-- Small jug and paper dust masks

-- Set of measuring spoons

-- Stirring spoon

-- 2l bottle for storing brine

Materials

-- AAA GSL Brine Shrimp Eggs

-- Marine salt

Method

1. Make up 2 litres of brine: dissolve 3 tablespoons of marine salt in 0.5l of hot water, top up from tap and shake the bottle well!

2. Fill hatcher #1 to 3/4 full with brine; vigorously stir in 1/16 to 1/8 teaspoon of eggs, depending on the size of the spawn; put the top back on (with airline); turn on air to fast bubble. (I generally find that the eggs moisten fairly quickly if they're stirred well to begin with, but sometimes have to stir in a few later, that have stuck above the water line).

3. Place the lamp close to the hatcher and leave it on 24hrs/day.

4. 24 hours later, turn off lamp, turn off air and allow BBS to settle to bottom of hatcher for 5 mins.

5. Place jug with dust mask under the tap, turn it on and drain out enough BBS for a feed. Return the brine to the hatcher and turn air and lamp back on. (Lower bubble rate when BBS have fully hatched).

6. Rinse BBS off mask (using tank water) and feed: or else just swoosh the mask directly in the fry tank.

7. Fill and start hatcher #2.

8. Rinse and refill hatcher #1 when feeding from hatcher #2 starts.

I usually get 2 - 3 feeds from one hatch, by which time the second hatch is ready. When emptying the hatcher with the last lot of BBS, nearly all of the shells stick to the sides of the hatcher (especially if you use Pepsi bottles, because they've got swirly indentations that trap the shells :lookaround: ). I re-use the brine until it gets too manky, and top it up from the stock bottle as needed.

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Posted

My method is almost identical, but I use an airstone thru the cap and stabilise it in another cut up coke bottle sorta half wrapped in aluminium foil to contain the heat from the lamp and when I collect the bbs I put the lamp on the floor under the hatchery to help the bbs decide which way is down the foil to get them to collect in one place and use a pipette to collect them.

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Posted (edited)

Here's my method, so far so good! 2L coke bottle. Aged water Rock salt (un-iodined) Pipette Small container filled with fresh aged water. Top of oscar's aquarium Half fill coke bottle with aged water. Add 1tsp of rock salt and shake till disolved (good to get rid of anger but remember to keep the cap on). Add a sprinking of eggs and put ontop of aquarium light that runs 24/7 and add airstone, bobble airstone occasionally to get the eggs that settled up and moving again. When hatched pour into 2L storage container, sit close to light ontop of a sheet of paper. When BBS go towards the light suck them out with pipette into fresh water container. From there wait till BBS congregate around light and suck them up in a syringe and feed to fry. For next feed, suck out old shells and resprinkle with more eggs before pouring back into bottle and restarting process. I only get about 30 fry at a time so I haven't had to go "massive scale" yet and two bottles seem to last me ages.

Edited by Em

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Posted

:( coke bottles...they are so useful in the betta spawning rounds... I have a coke bottle full of salty water either from the beach or make my own same as everyone, stir it when I think of it and keep it under a lamp for heat...siphon out into coffee-paper-filters then I chuck the paper filter into tank inside-out and the fry come running/swimming-fast :(:) couldnt be easier..sometimes I'll add a teaspoon of bi-carb to the water if I think of it...

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Posted

Within the first few hours of hydration, the Artemia cyst swells into a spherical shape and its diameter does not subsequently increase further. At full hydration, active metabolism will begin provided illumination of approximately 2000 Lux at the water surface is present as a trigger. This metabolism converts embryo food reserves into glygogen, (for energy), and glycerol which accumulates in the outer cuticle membrane. Glycerol itself is very hydroscopic and more water from the surrounding hatching solution is absorbed. At a critical point, the outer cuticle membrane ruptures, (“breaking”), and the glycerol is released into the hatching solution. Up to breaking, salt is not necessary in the hatching solution. Indeed, as the salinity increases, a higher concentration of glycerol must be built-up over a longer period of time to rupture the membrane, resulting in increased depletion of food reserves. At breaking, the Artemia embryo is in indirect contact with the hatching solution which must now be of similar ionic strength to seawater with a pH 8 – 9. Natural seawater has a salinity of about 35 parts per thousand. However, at 5ppt, less glycerol is needed for breaking to occur; hatching efficiency is greater and nauplii have a higher energy content. Therefore, it is recommended that the hatching solution is prepared by diluting one part seawater with seven parts freshwater and the addition of 2g/L sodium bicarbonate. There are some other critical factors that effect hatching: ·Temperature should be maintained constant between 25 and 30 degrees. ·A minimum dissolved oxygen of 2mg/L is essential for hatching. This can be easily achieved with coarse air bubbling into the hatch container. Fine airstones are not recommended because of foaming which will trap the cysts and nauplii. ·Cyst density should not exceed 5g/L This concept of dilute a hatch solution seems rather radical and many people question its validity. However, it has been well tested by the original author, (and myself). I suggest you give it a try, either out of curiosity or just for the savings in seawater use. Reference Sorgeloos P. 1986. Manual for the culture and use of brine shrimp artemia in aquaculture. The Belgian Administration for Development Cooperation The FAO of UN

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Posted

wow...that is the most excellent description of how the lil dudes hatch I have ever come across...I shall certainly pop down the beach and grab a bottle of salt-water to try this and shall update the results for all to read...

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Posted

The microfibre cloths that you get from the optometrist make great bbs filters. I wasn't having much luck finding un-waterproof dustmasks and my coffee filter paper kept breaking along the seams.

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Posted

I bubble away the same batch of salt water for about three days, just drawing off the bbs I need a couple of times a day and adding new eggs and I've found that as the salinity increases (due to evaporation) less eggs hatch.

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Posted

I didn't make it clear in the hatching description, but when "breaking" occurs, the glycerol is released into the hatch solution. Bacteria in the water and from the cyst shells utilise the glycerol as a food source and the solution rapidly deteriorates in quality. I wouldn't recommend using the solution more than twice. Keith

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Posted

Yes. The solution deteriorates over three days. That's the reminder to throw it out. It saves on washing up effort if you don't have to do a new bottle every day - works well for small batches of fry.

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Posted (edited)

I've had a few ppl ask me about the BBS Hatcher & Feeder gadget that I bought from eBay. So I thought I'd give you the run down here of how it works, what it looks like and the things I've found out by trial and error.

I bought 5 of these gadgets from a US seller on eBay for $11.99 US each plus about $50 postage to Australia. The US seller had about 90 of them at the time and selling them at the 'Buy It Now' price and not as an auction item. They took about 1 month to arrive.

Pictures from the eBay listing

Posted Image

Posted Image

Here's a photo of the BBS Hatcher in my grow out tank. To give you an idea of the size, the grown out tank is 2' Length x 1' Height. So the gadget is about 25cm tall.

Posted Image

Now for a list of things that I've found out since I started using them.

1. It's too tall to work in the spawn tank when the water is at the 5 inch mark...you can't use it until you've topped up the water level.

2. Don't overfill it with BBS - this clogs up the gadget and you end up with BBS cysts floating all over the tank. Plus you end up with more BBS then your spawn can eat.

3. Clean it every couple of days, or it starts to smell. Although this could have been a result of me overfilling the gadget with BBS.

4. If you overfill it, keep a close eye on your water quality - it can send your water toxic pretty quickly and start killing your spawn (as I found out today :) )

5. It does supply your spawn with live BBS all day.

6. You need to fiddle with the air supply a bit - too much and you end up with cysts all over the tank, too little and the cysts end up at the bottom of the gadget and not circulating in the air

7. Cleaning is easy - it comes with it's own cleaning brush and a quick rub & scrub under the tap and it's clean.

8. Take it out of the tank when doing a water change - the change in the water level normally results in cysts floating in the tank.

9. Have a lamp or some type of light directly above the exit hole of the hatcher to encourage the BBS to come out.

I think that about covers everything I've discovered so far......overall I'm fairly happy with it...considering that I was having no luck hatching BBS by other methods.

I'll probably order some more in the near future, so that I can have one in all my spawn / grow out tanks.

BTW - here's a link to the US seller on eBay if anyone wants to buy there own, or send me a PM if you'd like me to order one for you when I buy my next lot....

AquaRule.com

Cheers

Fiona

Edited by RedDragon

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Posted

2L coke bottle I use bilo cooking salt :P. The BBS die after about 24 hours because of this, but I only use them for 12 hours so it doesn't matter. Not sure how much I put in, I use a hydrometer to guide me. An old crusty lamp that is hot enough and bright enough to heat the water on the coldest of nights. Sometimes, I put the bottles on the window sill, but my cat loves water - big no no :lol: An airstone. Ausaqua PTY LTD eggs (nothing to do with us!) They hatch in 18 hours!!! Easy peasy, no fuss ;)

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Posted

I got sea water (cause I live near the coast) added some rocksalt, then added water to a jar, added some brine shrimp eggs, swooshed it all around and 12-24hrs later viola! BBS! Actually, got a better hatch rate than I was expecting :P

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Posted

Built myself one of those the other day... works great1

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Posted

I use the upside down softdrink bottle, with an airstone, tubing etc. I use an old lamp too. I keep the live bbs in a container in the fridge for a few days then do another hatchery once I'm close to running out.

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Posted

the bbs lose a lot of nutritional value after 24 hours, once they have absorbed their yolk sac. you're better off hatching new ones every day :P

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Posted

Dang ok, I'll keep that in mind. Thanks for that Lilli.

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Posted

just freeze them... thats what i do!

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Posted

I get a better hatch rate if I dont airate the water :D

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Posted

me too!

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